Glycine now in stock £10.00 for 454 g (1 lb)


UPDATE (May 2022) – Please note, the 454g tub is no longer available. I now supply glycine in 500g pots for £11


I am now able to dispense supplemental glycine at my clinic at a very good price. The sturdy pot is resealble and contains a full imperial pound (454g) of this conditionally essential amino-acid. If you wish to purchase please contact me here:

Phone 01243 868108 or
Contact me now to purchase


About Glycine

Glycine is an important amino acid which we get in modest quantities from protein-rich foods plus we  make a few grams per day in our own body. Recently, however, scientists have realised that humans are chronically deficient in glycine which is needed in much higher amounts than previously thought.

The research on glycine supplementation is remarkable, as it is involved in a huge range of metabolic processes including: cell repair and protection, collagen synthesis, mood and sleep regulation, blood sugar control and longevity.

I highly recommend the in-depth article I have written on my blog which covers all the latest science on the function of glycine: 10 reasons to supplement with Glycine

10 Reasons To Supplement With Glycine

Some Key Points from the article:

  1. Everyone is glycine deficient due to an evolutionary bottleneck that limits the quantity we can synthesise
  2. Supplementing glycine at 10g per day improves collagen synthesis by 200%
  3. Glycine has a range of anti-inflammatory effects
  4. Glycine has stabilising effects on the central nervous system and improves sleep
  5. Glycine has a range of anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects
  6. Glycine protects cells from damage due to injury, trauma, hypoxia, cold etc
  7. Glycine protects the stomach and intestines, reducing inflammation and ulceration
  8. Glycine increases the body’s antioxidant capacity and enhances detoxification by multiple pathways
  9. Glycine has a range of benefits for the cardiovascular system, improving clotting, heart function and improving blood lipids
  10. Glycine has longevity, anti-glycation and anti-cancer properties

If you wish to purchase a 500g tub of glycine, phone me 01243 868108 or send me a message here.

Fees

Consultation Fee£ 92 /hr
– Initial consultations are typically 1 to 2 hrs£ 92 to 184*
– Follow up consultations are typically ½ hr£ 46
Herbal prescriptions£ 5 to 10 /wk
Supplements (these vary a lot)£ 5 to 40 /mo
Lab Testing (depending on the test)£ 30 to 500

*After the first hour I charge in 15 minute increments, so if a consultation takes 1 hour and 20 minutes you will only be charged for 1¼ hours, if takes 1hour 40 minutes I will charge for 1½ hours. The initial consultation fee is capped at 2 hrs (£184)


Payment

Fees are payable at the end of each appointment by cash, cheque or card.
SumUp-cards-accepted


Late cancellation fee
Cancellations with less than 24 hrs notice incur a fee of £46

Concessions
If you are on benefits a reduction of £10 per hour will be applied to the consultation fee.

Covid-19 antibody Lab Test — £92

Available now — results typically returned within 48 hours

• RELIABLE IgG test (98% accurate)
• PRIVATE – you do not have to inform your doctor
• £90 COST (subject to change) includes blood draw, centrifuge and lab test.

Available now: IgG Antibody Test for Coroanvirus. (Not the same as the rapid test).

Long lasting IgG antibodies can be measured from around 14-21 days after infection. This blood test establishes whether you have had SARS-CoV-2 through the identification of IgG antibodies.

You will need to come into the clinic to have a blood draw. We then centrifuge the blood and send it to our partner lab — the largest in the UK — who provide results within 2-3 working days.

Test Specificity 100%, Sensitivity 97.5%

If you have antibodies then you are probably immune.

£92

Phone now on 01243 868108 to book your test or for further information.
or contact me here

 

 

Some Herbs in the Clinic Garden

Below are some photos from the clinic garden showing some of the medicinal herbs thriving there. Each of these plants has a long history of traditional use and folk-law surrounding it. Some of these herbs I use in my practice (although I rarely use them directly from the garden!)

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  1. Butcher’s Broom (Ruscus aculeatus)
    This strange plant with prickly pseudo-leaves grows in deep shade, even under the dense cover of yew trees. Traditionally this herb has been used to treat haemorrhoids and poor blood circulation, and current Medical Herbalists employ it, along with other herbs, in treating varicose veins.
  2. Cowslip (Primula veris)
    Medicine made from cowslip help to thin mucus, so it has been used to treat sinusitis, coughs and colds but it also has a role in muscle spasms and treating heart failure. I find it particularly useful in treating coughs in children.
  3. Greater Celandine (Chelidonium majus)
    When any part of this part is broken it oozes an intense yellow sap. This sap is used fresh, straight from the plant, in the treatment of warts and verrucas. I have seen good results with this treatment, especially when used frequently and persistently for some days or weeks.
  4. Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum)
    Like most members of the Geraniaceae family this pretty flower has useful astringent properties. So in cases of diarrhoea, nausea, gastritis, inflamed gums or any other inflammation or swollen tissues, a tea made with this  herb can be safely used internally or externally. Some say the pungent smell of the fresh leaves will ward off mosquitos if rubbed fresh onto the skin.
  5. Lungwort (Pulmonaria officinalis)
    The clue is in the name with this distinctive herb. Conditions of the lungs, of any sort, will find relief with this mucilaginous, soothing herb. Inflammation has a crucial role to play in tissue response to assaults of many kinds, but it can get into a vicious circle and persist long after the cause is gone. In the lungs we can see bronchitis and persistent coughs in this light, and they respond wonderfully to the use of this anti inflammatory herbal medicine.
  6. Pasque-flower (Pulsatilla vulgaris)
    I love this flower, and they love my garden! Not only are the flowers utterly delightful, but the seed heads are just lovely too. They look spiky but are soft as feathers. And in some sort of parallel to this they diffuse nasty acute pain, such as ear ache and other tissue specific pain, and I also find it valuable where emotional pain is an issue. Small and pretty it may be, but I rate this as a powerful herb.
  7. Perennial Cornflower (Centaurea montana)
    An infusion can be used as a treatment for dropsy, constipation, as a mouthwash for bleeding gums and as an eye bath for conjunctivitis, but I don’t tend to use this stunning herb for anything other than its handsome, nay, regal, good looks.
  8. Stonecrop or Orpine (Sedum telephium)
    Like Aloe-Vera, the mucilage in the succulent leaves of stonecrop can promptly and effectively treat burns, scalds and inflamed skin: break open a leaf and rub the jelly on the affected area. It is also an anti-inflammatory for the gut, as are other mucilaginous herbs.
  9. Sweet Cicely (Myrrhis odorata)
    This is a useful culinary plant  as every part of it – leaves, flowers and seeds – are edible, with a taste that is both sweet and aniseed in character. This natural sweetness can be put to use in cooking and is especially good with rhubarb, as it counters the astringency and dental effects of the oxalic acid in this rather high oxalate stem ‘fruit’. It can be used in other desserts too, allowing a lot less sugar to be used.